Shagbark's Curiosity

Shagbark's Curiosity Hello and welcome. You've entered another little corner of the Internet where I reside.

landscapelifescape:

Mungkid, Magelang, Indonesia
One Morning Village by nooreva

Reblogged from southeastasianists

landscapelifescape:

Mungkid, Magelang, Indonesia

One Morning Village by nooreva

thecarefree-art:

a doodle of my culture’s traditional wedding outfit which is still worn by brides in several areas of the country (although nowadays it’s slowly turning into more of a traditional dance costume because it’s just so shiny and pretty) and gold does play an important part in our culture (even our jong sarat is lined with gold thread sdfkhjg) 
and you know flowers lots of flowers
Track I listened to : (Surprise it’s my traditional music ahah)

Reblogged from thecarefree-art

thecarefree-art:

a doodle of my culture’s traditional wedding outfit which is still worn by brides in several areas of the country (although nowadays it’s slowly turning into more of a traditional dance costume because it’s just so shiny and pretty) and gold does play an important part in our culture (even our jong sarat is lined with gold thread sdfkhjg) 

and you know flowers lots of flowers

Track I listened to : (Surprise it’s my traditional music ahah)

peerintothepast:

British soldiers eating hot rations in the Ancre Valley during the Battle of the Somme, October 1916. (© IWM Photographer - Lt. Ernest Brooks)
The battle of the Ancre Heights of 1 October-11 November 1916 was part of the wider first battle of the Somme. It was fought on the left of the British line of the Somme, with the aim of pinching out a German salient on the Ancre River created by the limited British advances further along the line. The attack was to be launched by the Reserve Army, which held the front on either side of the Ancre. (Colourisation by Benjamin Thomas from Australia)

Reblogged from peerintothepast

peerintothepast:

British soldiers eating hot rations in the Ancre Valley during the Battle of the Somme, October 1916.
(© IWM Photographer - Lt. Ernest Brooks)

The battle of the Ancre Heights of 1 October-11 November 1916 was part of the wider first battle of the Somme. It was fought on the left of the British line of the Somme, with the aim of pinching out a German salient on the Ancre River created by the limited British advances further along the line. The attack was to be launched by the Reserve Army, which held the front on either side of the Ancre.
(Colourisation by Benjamin Thomas from Australia)

v64gallery6:

Low Life By Pongsakul Chalao #artonline #artstudio #mixedmedia #fineart #thaiartists #landscape #loei #indyartists #Jeans #artgallery #bangkok #thailand #pongsakul www.v64gallery6.com/artists/pongsakul-chalao/

Reblogged from southeastasianists

v64gallery6:

Low Life
By Pongsakul Chalao #artonline #artstudio #mixedmedia #fineart #thaiartists #landscape #loei #indyartists #Jeans #artgallery #bangkok #thailand #pongsakul www.v64gallery6.com/artists/pongsakul-chalao/

ancientpeoples:

Painted pottery ring-flask. Height: 22.8 cm. Meroitic, 1st - 2nd Century AD. Faras, Sudan.
(Source: British Museum)

Reblogged from ancientpeoples

ancientpeoples:

Painted pottery ring-flask. Height: 22.8 cm. Meroitic, 1st - 2nd Century AD. Faras, Sudan.

(Source: British Museum)

ancientpeoples:

Marble Anthropoid Sarcophagus
Late 5th Century BC
Graeco-Phoenician
The lid of the sarcophagus shows an unarticulated, downward tapering body and the head of a woman framed by flowing hair; traces of red paint are still preserved in the hair. At the foot end of the box and on the lid appears the Phoenician letter “shin.” According to recent investigations, the anthropoid sarcophagi of marble were quarried on the Greek island of Paros. They were prepared up to a certain point and finished at their destinations. The inscribed letters here strongly suggest that the sculptor was Phoenician, which would be entirely plausible at Amathus and Kition, two centers of Phoenician occupation on Cyprus. Such fine, expensive coffins inspired local copies in limestone and terracotta.
(Source: The Metropolitan Museum)

Reblogged from ancientpeoples

ancientpeoples:

Marble Anthropoid Sarcophagus

Late 5th Century BC

Graeco-Phoenician

The lid of the sarcophagus shows an unarticulated, downward tapering body and the head of a woman framed by flowing hair; traces of red paint are still preserved in the hair. At the foot end of the box and on the lid appears the Phoenician letter “shin.” According to recent investigations, the anthropoid sarcophagi of marble were quarried on the Greek island of Paros. They were prepared up to a certain point and finished at their destinations. The inscribed letters here strongly suggest that the sculptor was Phoenician, which would be entirely plausible at Amathus and Kition, two centers of Phoenician occupation on Cyprus. Such fine, expensive coffins inspired local copies in limestone and terracotta.

(Source: The Metropolitan Museum)

Reblogged from southeastasianists

Sabah, Borneo, Malaysia

(Source: mayack)

Reblogged from walkingphrase

languageek:

21 Ways to Say Hello found here. 

Reblogged from anthropologydaily

awordaday4u:

TED-Ed | How languages evolve - Alex Gendler

hmongxperience:

Cambodian musician 1907

Reblogged from fckyeahcambodia

hmongxperience:

Cambodian musician 1907